ECN publication
Title:
Elektrische auto en elektriciteitsvoorziening.
 
Author(s):
 
Published by: Publication date:
ECN Policy Studies 1990
 
ECN report number: Document type:
ECN-I--90-036 ECN publication
 
Number of pages: Full text:
38 Download PDF  

Abstract:
Studies on altemative energy carriers for transportation vehicles have been started recently at ECN. One of the opportunities in this respect is the electric passenger car with a lead-acid or Na-S battery. In this study the interacfion between the large scale introduction of electric passenger cars and the public power system has heen analysed for the Dutch situation in the year 2010. The potential maximum number of electric cars has been determined taking into account three factors: the limited range with respect to driving patterns, the available capacity in the low voltage distribution system and the spare production capacity in the central power system during night hours. On basis of the results the hourly loadcurve for the year 2010 has been modified for cases with 1 to 3.6 million electric cars. With these loadcurves production simulations were carried out with two different power system configurations. One system concentrated on gas fired, the other on nuclear, power as supplement to coal plants. The mean and marginal efficiency and fuel costs of the electricity produced and the extra emissions of SO2 and NOx have been determined for each case. A comparison has been made between the primary energy requirements, the energy costs and the total air pollution per kilometer of the electric car and a very efficient future petrol engine car. This leads to the conclusion that electric cars save primary energy, reduce national emissions of air polluting agents (except SO2) and have significant lower energycosts per kilometer. A substantial part of the car-kilometers could be ’electric’ before there is a need for extra installed capacity. A large scale introduction could lead to strong positive effects for the urban air quality and could also diminish the great reliance on oil.


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