ECN publication
Title:
Broeikasgasemissies van gebouwen: Een vergelijking tussen PUR-schuimen en CFK/HCFK-vrije isolatiematerialen.
 
Author(s):
 
Published by: Publication date:
ECN Policy Studies 1991
 
ECN report number: Document type:
ECN-C--91-055 ECN publication
 
Number of pages: Full text:
38 Download PDF  

Abstract:
The annual greenhouse gas emissions flora heating and from insulation material from various buildings under Netherlands climatic conditions have been evaluated for different insulation material alternatives, This ranking of insulation materials with respect to global warming has been done for the Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment. The comparison between insulation materials was directed to polyurethane (PU) foam with CFCs or HCFCs as blowing agent and common-used (H)CFC-free insulation materials, like mineral wool and expanded polystyrene (EPS). A heat balanee model was used to assess the effects of insulation material on heating. Walls, roof and floor were insulated at the same time. CFC and HCFC emissions were transformed in CO2 equivalent emissions by using the Global Warming Potential (GWP) concept. Sensitivity runs have been performed with high and low GWP values, different climatic conditions and various (H)CFC emission rates. The results for the four building types (old and newly built single family dwelling, old and newly built factory building) were similar. PU foam blown with CFC- 11, of which the use is currently being limited, had highest CO2 equivalent emission in all eases, due to the high GWP of CFC-11. Despite the lower insulating properties of mineral wool, EPS and HCFC-123 or HCFC-141b blown PU foam, buildings insulated with these materials appear to have much lower CO2 equivalent emissions than those insulated with CFC-11 blown PU foam. Buildings insulated with PU foam blown with HCFC-22 or with HCFC-142b have considerable CO2 equivalent emissions, and seem, with respect to global warming, rather poor alternatives for CFC-11 blown PU foam.


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